All U.S. cotton entering China must be fumigated for Zika virus

ACSA has learned recently of the requirement to fumigate all US cotton entering China due to Zika virus. Earlier this year several Latin American countries were required by the Chinese CIQ to fumigate their cotton entering the PRC.

Yuan Associates office has provided the information below from the Chinese Department of Supervision on Health Quarantine at AQSIQ with further details on the requirements for US cotton. More details may be made available and we will certainly circulate such when we obtain.

Here are our findings per your question:

  1. The U.S. cotton destined for China must be fumigated for Zika virus.

We have confirmed this requirement with Ms. PU, official from the Department of Supervision on Health Quarantine at AQSIQ.  On August 3rd,  AQSIQ updated the Zika infection list and added 7 more countries, including the U.S.  The other 6 countries were: Guinea-Bissau, Switzerland, Spain, Cuba, Guadeloupe, and Saint Barthélemy.  Ms. PU explained that as long as one area in the county has been detected for Zika virus, the shipments from the entire country should be fumigated before entering the Chinese border.  According to AQSIQ’s notice, there were 12 states in the U.S. have confirmed Zika infections. In practice, AQSIQ is responsible for updating the list for the infected countries and areas, while Local CIQs will apply the same fumigation requirements on incoming inspection for all shipments from the identified origins.

  1. Inspection requirements:  
  2. The fumigation mainly targets containers of goods.
  3. The shippers should obtain an official quarantine certificate after fumigation at the origin, otherwise China will apply the fumigation at a local port.  Shippers could either select fumigation methods that kill general insects including mosquitos, or specific types of fumigation designed to target mosquitos. 
  4. If shippers will provide an official certificate, it should prove that mosquito was killed through the fumigation at origin. 
  5. If shippers want to conduct the fumigation upon arrival,  they will receive a quarantine notice from the local CIQ. Then, professional agencies/ institutions at the local port will apply the fumigation and issue the certificate. The time and financial costs of fumigation depend on each local port. Normally, it takes at least one working day.

Please feel free to let us know if you have any further questions.

 

 

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